Racing Maxims And Methods Of Pittsburgh Phil

Overview

  1. Racing Maxims And Methods Of Pittsburgh Phil
  2. Racing Maxims And Methods Of Pittsburgh Philosopher

Pittsburgh Phil, Racing Maxims and methods of the The Patron Saint of Punters - George E Smith. The shop began as Gambler's Book Club in 1964, with Luckman envisioning 'not just a bookstore, but a library of gambling and a forum for gamblers to gather and visit, argue, gossip, lie, and - most of all - learn from each other'. After 45 years the shop moved from South 11th to 1550 Tropicana which instantly expanded their retail space and improved their location with better parking.

A legendary classic packed with some of the best horseplaying advice ever, which reveals the observations and handicapping techniques of Pittsburg Phil, the most successful handicapper of his time.
This legendary classic, originally published in 1908, and still sought after today, reveals the observations and handicapping techniques of Pittsburg Phil, AKA George Smith, the most successful handicapper of his time. Smith won over $1.7 million, a fortune in the early part of the 20th century. The author covers topics as time handicapping, class and weight, honest jockeys, effect of drugs on performance, the impact of time and weight, and includes dozens of winning tips on successful handicapping. The book contains some of the best horseplaying advice ever and has stood the test of time for generations of horseplayers. The basic principles of beating the track are the same today as before, with readers getting a chance to learn from one of the greatest horse bettors ever.

QFrom Holly Young: I love your site and have found it most helpful in many instances. I was wondering if you could possibly find out the origin of the term shoe in, meaning someone will win for sure.

A This one is spelled wrongly so often that it’s likely it will eventually end up that way. The correct form is shoo-in, usually with a hyphen. It has been known in that spelling and with the meaning of a certain winner from the 1930s. It came from horse racing, where a shoo-in was the winner of a rigged race.

Racing Maxims And Methods Of Pittsburgh Phil

In turn that seems to have come from the verb shoo, meaning to drive a person or an animal in a given direction by making noises or gestures, which in turn comes from the noise people often make when they do it.

The shift to the horse racing sense seems to have occurred sometime in the early 1900s. C E Smith made it clear how it came about in his Racing Maxims and Methods of Pittsburgh Phil in 1908: “There were many times presumably that ‘Tod’ would win through such manipulations, being ‘shooed in’, as it were”.

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Racing Maxims And Methods Of Pittsburgh Philosopher

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